Script for convict research!!

I’m katie and miss fitz and mr mayes has given us a task to answer some questions and a interesting way, so here we go……..

 

What Were The Differences between the life of male,female and child colonist?

 

Male:There life depended on who they worked for and the working conditions and what skills they can bring to the table, if there skills weren’t as good as they say they were they would be tortured.

Convicts living at Hyde Park Barracks were employed by the government  most of the time (known as Government men)

 

(Another video)

They were ruled under strict conditions they would obey their orders from the superintendent and convict constables.

 

The ringing of the bells in the barracks yard would sign to them when to get up in the morning, when to eat and when to go to there hammock at night.

 

women were treated as slaves and wo

What Were The Differences between the life of male,female and child colonist?

 

Male:There life depended on who they worked for and the working conditions and what skills they can bring to the table, if there skills weren’t as good as they say they were they would be tortured.

Convicts living at Hyde Park Barracks were employed by the government  most of the time (known as Government men)

 

(Another video)

They were ruled under strict conditions they would obey their orders from the superintendent and convict constables.

 

What were the differences between the life of a male,female and child convicts

 

Female:In the year 1820’s women were settled in places called “Female Factories.”                                    These factories were both prisons and working spaces, the women were treated as slaves and workers.                    In 1821 the female factory was opened in Parramatta in New South Wales.The building was designed by convict architect Francis Greenway between 1777 to 1837 to house 300 women in a three story stone building. By 1829 the population increased to 537 women and 61 children.The women wore clothes known as ‘slop’s’ in blue or brown or they would wear a stuffed gown with a white apron and a straw bonnet.

 

The girl’s would be in charge of task’s outside like feeding domestics animals such as goats,chickens horses,rabbits

and ducks. Preparing the veggie patch for the market garden and planting and harvesting small crops.

 

Child convict

Child:Orphaned and convict children as young as ten years of age were sent to work as slaves and servants for a settler of an emancipist, which is someone pardoned from prison.The children remained with their mothers until the age of four.

(another video)

The girl’s would be in charge of task’s outside like feeding domestics animals such as goats,chickens horses,rabbits and ducks,Preparing  the veggie patch for the market garden and planting and harvesting small crops.Convict and orphaned boys aged between 9 and 18 worked as herdsman signed to settlers as they were usually too unhealthy and small for rough work like cleaning land and building roads.

Famous convicts

Francis Greenway:Francis Greenway arrived in Sydney in 1814 because his friends told him to plead guilty to forging a document when he went bankrupt.He did pretty well as a convict, some of his works are The Government House ,St James’s church in Sydney and the female factory etc.

He is famous for all the building he’s constructed above, he was also famous for being on the old 10 dollar note.

(another video)

Mary Wade

Mary Wade was the youngest convict, aged ten. She was born October the 5th 1777 to George Wade and Mary English and died at the age of 82 December 17 1859. She had three children William Brooker,Sarah Brooker, Edward Harrigan, John and Elizabeth.

She spent her day begging on the streets of London until she was convicted for stealing clothes from another child (a frock from a 10 year old). Mary Wade was meant to be sentenced to a hanging but ended up getting transported to Australia.                                                                                     She got transported to Norfolk, New South Wales by “Lady Julianna” on the 3rd on June 1790 and travelled with 241 fellow convicts.
Poem i found and liked

“The law locks up the man or women

Who steals the goose from the commen

But lets the greater villain loose

Who steals the common from the goose”

Poem from Convictcreations.com

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